Web 3.0: The Next Frontier for Creators with Matt Cimaglia
Brand-Side
Brand-Side

Episode · 4 months ago

Web 3.0: The Next Frontier for Creators with Matt Cimaglia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

From the printing press to radio to the internet, massive rewards await the first to figure out how to leverage exciting new technologies to engage an audience.

So, it stands to reason that savvy brands and creators are scrambling to gain a foothold in today’s burgeoning Web 3.0 gold rush.

But before you start frantically producing NFTs, you need to ask:

Am I making this content for the sake of making it — or is it delivering real value to my audience?

An expert in finding that value, today’s guest, Matt Cimaglia, CEO and co- founder of Alteon, has built a career capitalizing on emerging technologies. In this episode, he draws on his expertise to demystify the world of Web 3.0.

Join us as we discuss:

  • How Matt has identified and capitalized on emerging tech trends throughout his career
  • How Web 3.0 and NFTs are giving creators more control over their content
  • How to get started with NFTs

Find this interview and many more by subscribing to BRAND-SIDE on Spotify, on Apple Podcasts, or on our website.

Welcome to brand side, a new podcast by Celtra, where we interview marketing creative operations and design meters to find out what life is like in house, first agency side and how big creative ideas come to life at the world's best prance. This is brand side by Sultra. Hello, hello, and welcome back to brandside. Today we have Matt Si Maglia, Co founder and CEO of Third Summit, the company behind the revolutionally digital ascid management software. AUTEE ON MATT is passionate about building companies, blockchain, the Creator Economy and Web Frie, and these are all topics that will dive into today. Matt, welcome on the show. Thank you so much for having me. Real pleasutic connect now. It's very exciting and I think this episode is going to be so educational for all of those marketers and creatives listening, because we'll be talking about things that a lot of people are interested in. There's a lot of buzz around it, but then a lot of people don't know too much about the opportunities of Web Thrie, and so before we get into all of that, I want the cliff notes. Who Are you? What is your journey into the creative industry and, ultimately, entrepreneurship and and founding the company that you leave today. So how many hours do we have for the show? We have all the time in the world. Fire Away. Well, I would say. You know, I got my career really started I graduated college and was applying for various positions at news agencies and production companies in the Orlando, Florida area and, being as young as I was and having little or no professional experience, if you will, I just kept getting turned down job after job. So at that time period, as one does, I created a company and it was for the proverbial we right. So I ended up creating this production company and got a couple pretty big clients because I probably underbid everyone else, and I did it over the phone because I was too nervous to do it in person given my age, and that really launched my career and throughout the course of year a couple of years, ended up getting picked...

...up by NBC network to really start integrating digital methodology into their workflow for news gathering. So I was an editor and producer as a contractor for them, while still building my production company on the side. And at a certain point I had that tipping point of do I want to work for another company or do I really want to focus on building my own business and being very entrepreneurial? And I come from a very entrepreneurial family. I really don't. I don't head in on creating my company. And you have to think about the landscape at that time period too, because we were pre facebook and presocial media and pre youtube. Even so, we were often, you know, sending out DVDs to people to reach massive amount of a couple hundred people and, you know, we were working with some brands. We are doing a lot of digital storytelling that we didn't know was digital storytelling then. And and I think that one of the catalysts for me personally for deciding to also go head first into starting my own company was I was in a meeting one day with NBC and I said, you know, and I was with somebody very senior, and I said, look, you know, I'm done with a nightly news story at noon, but nightly does an air until thirty PM eastern time. Why can't I addit another version and release it on the Internet? And he flat out looked at me and said that were the network. Nobody's going to watch content on a computer and and that that moment in time for me was really that okay, I need to get out of here and I need to get out as fast as possible. And so, you know, started really building my own company and shifted it to Chicago at that time period, and it was at such a perfect time period because I was then able to expand out, leveraging technology, storytelling and and it was it was at a time when people were starting to publish content on an online channel of their own...

...or, you know, word press was starting to become a thing, or blogger at the time was a thing where people would post little snippets of videos, and I love the fact that I really built the company up during that age because we were certainly trying a lot of things that, you know, we were throwing Spaghetti at the wall and subsequently got a couple very large clients out of it. The Best Meeting for me was I get a call one day from the head of communications for all state insurance, their base just outside of Chicago at that time period, and he said, hey, we heard about this thing called Youtube. Do you know how to produce video for it? And it was literally one of those Aha moments for us, because I had a small team and we were like this is exactly what we're already doing with file based videos. Now we can, we can, you know, prop it up on an actual channel. So fast forward, you know, a decade goes by and I was very fortunate that I was able to exit the business and and really at a time period, and it's sort of Cliche to say, but it's almost like, you know, when you take all the blocks down, you know that you could then rebuild something bigger, and for me it was. It was very much so that as a mentality for how I was moving forward in my professional life and I sat on a couple boards and I was doing some consulting work and that's subsequently what led me to building the thesis behind all Teon, which is my my content management system and and production ecosystem that is out there now, and you know, it's very much so leveraging enterprise class software that was not accessible to people like you or people like my old production company, you know, anyone from a independent creator to medium size studio, they just don't have these tools that a lot of the one percent of the creation or media marketing industry has, and so that...

...that's really sort of what struck a chord with me when building out what we now have as alteon. And then so all tim is a subsidiary off Third Summit, the company that you founded. And so talk to me a little bit about third summit and what you do and the products it develop. Obviously, all tion is the flagship product, if I understood correctly, but would love to her hear a little bit more about that. Well, I'll start on the branding side. The way that I came up with the name Third Summit is I've done Everest Base camp, I've done Kilimanjaro Summit and I felt like building another company was like my third summit. So that's how I came up with the name third summit. But but really it's all Tan. You know, all third someone is more of a holding company, right, and and you know, all te on is the product that that you know, is forward facing from a marketing perspective and also from a user perspective. And you know, when you look at the way that we have building this been building this company from the beginning, is we always had blockchain in mind and we're very fortunate in the sense that we started this company just prior to Covid, we had this remote mentality in the sort of forefront of how we were building the product and we always knew that it was going to be an uphill battle to sort of convince people to work more remote at that time period, you know, get into more of a sort of process on not going to offices. And then all of a sudden covid hit and we were sitting on this company and we were like, how is it that we were already building the product that is really perfect for content creators and agencies and marketers today, and and you know that whole world has shifted so much into the core, alteon is a content management system. It's also a media orchestration tool and when I say that it's there are so many things behind the scenes, or under the hood, if you will, that are happening that are beneficial for content creators as opposed to a traditional, you know, dropbox or Google drive like...

...service to just transfer files to and from people. HMM. And so for Alteon, when you started building it, you said that blockchain was very much you had it in mind from the very beginning. Is it was that the sort of the founding idea behind the product, or did you just start out by saying, okay, the creators and marketers and agencies just need a better cloud based tool for managing their files and then it transitioned into, you know, hosting that on or having that base on blockchain? Like? What was the process like? It's a bit of both. I think it was simultaneous. You know, when you're building a company you look at the technologies that are available of that time period and at that time period blockchain was very much so in vogue and in a lot of people were talking about it on a higher level. Right, nobody really knew and I even think even today, as much buzz is going on in that world, I still don't think that we quite know where it's going to go. And that's exciting and again I think that that puts me right back into the seat of when I was running my creative agency. When Youtube came out, nobody knew what it was going to be. You know, it was cats playing keyboards at that time period. Nobody knew that a major corporation would then start doing all of their communication there or networks would start posting, you know, sort of syndicated television shows on a platform that people would then stream and and you know, this was this was very much so of revolutionary time period and I'm seeing that happen again and I'm so fortunate that I've been able to witness this a few times in my life. Yeah, you're absolutely right. I was just listening to this panel on the marketing possibilities off and if he's in the whole whole web three in crypto world, and one of the panelists did say that it is so tough to put together long term marketing plans in this ecosystem because it is so new and developing and things change so fast. But it does sound like you...

...have this ability of partly being in the right place at the right time but then also being able to sniff out the tendencies in the bigger trends in the industry that are going to end up distracting it as a whole. Look, I've been I've been wrong a couple times, right and and not necessarily wrong, but I think I've been too early on say of my my thoughts on how I wanted to build sub businesses or side businesses. I certainly think that as we have been building all tion were very much so at the right time, at the right time, at the replace in the right time, and I think that when we look at Internet bandwidth speeds right that's a huge catalyst for people saying I'm going to leverage cloud computing, because if you have a slow Internet connection, it's going to be not as great of an experience as somebody with a high speed Internet connection. But Five G is starting to roll out all over the country and fiber Internet is getting installed all over the country, and so we're really at this place in time where that is not going to be as much of an issue in the coming either months or years. And again we have covid to think for a lot of this, because the telecommunications industry really woke up to the stress that people are putting on their networks and the requirements of bandwidth that people are having. You and I, you know, a couple of years ago probably wouldn't have had this great of a conversation over high definition video or quality audio because that bandwidth just didn't exist. So when you really look at that evolutionary arc of the way that the Internet has evolved just in the last couple of years, again, this guy's really the limit of what we're going to be able to do in terms of possibilities for remote collaborators. Absolutely, and so then I've got a couple questions on web three, just because I'm sure it's a bit of a novel concept for a lot of our listeners as well. So if you're a marketer or a creative who has little knowledge off of what web three is, how would you...

...described the foundation, the possibilities, how it relates to the previous iterations of the Internet? So kind of like the crash course on it, if you will. I think that there's a lot of I use this analogy, in the past and it's always it's the next civilization. And you know, when you look at history, we as human beings, we learn from the past, right, we always try to even just evolve ourselves. You know, think about what what I was doing last year compared to this year for certain things in my life, you know I may have improved on because I've learned from those experiences. And the Internet is very much show the same thing. And when I look at web three, it's more around community and I love that aspect of it. And and I think that for content creators and marketers and people that are creating content, whether it's visual or, you know, audio or, you know, even wearable in the metaverse. You know, there's a lot of that happening right now. I think that we're at such a great time period where people really want to be collaborative, but people also want to be recognized for the work that they're doing and receive some sort of fee for that. Yeah, yeah, instead of us just given away our data for free for these giants. And actually have a follow up question on this. And sort of the flip side of it is there's also being some debate around with web three and with the metaverse. You know, there is this community, any aspect of it than the ability to own your own content that you produce and on your own data. But then, on the flip side, these giants like facebook, they are building just another version of a walled garden, would all these resources that they have using web three technologies. So what do you think about that? Do you think it's really going to be democratized, or do you think these giants would endless resources are going to end up kind of dominating and monetizing that space? To I think you're almost always going to have giants, for good or bad. Right I think that...

...there needs to be a little bit of regulation in some senses, but also there's a platform right in the people that build that platform. They have a lot of experience building that and managing it. In some ways. Even right now, you know, buying etherium or transferring from one and wallet to another, it's kind of clug. You know, it's not. It's not a very straightforward process. I think that there needs to be some in sensus, you know clean up, if you will, of the process. What I do like about it, though, in terms of where we're going with web three, is that a lot of this data in a lot of the debates that have been going on over the last, I would say, five years, right, because because prior to then people really didn't know that it was a debate just yet. This debate that's been going on with the last five years of who owns that piece of content. That's what I think is really going to get cleaned up and again, learning from the past. Right, I'm hopeful that some of these larger platforms, or entities, if you will, I'm hopeful that they will have learned from the past, hmm, figure out ways that they can potentially monetize their own business moving forward. That's not so evil in sort of collecting data on people or, quite frankly, not not rewarding those people for being a part of that network. HMM. And so for then, if it's all about ownership, and so for creators, for instance, like if now, let's say, you know, I found you on the Taylor streker show. And now for her it is amazing, just a plush of her right. No, she's a fantastic daily show, two hours of content every single day for I believe, starting at six hundred and ninety five. It's amazing. And what's so funny is we've, you know, been together, or I've been in her presence, if you will, several times where she's recording the show and it's just it's always just hilarious listening in the background to her recording. HMM, yeah, yeah, no, I started my every weekday morning with her. So very much a fan...

...and and very grateful to have you on the show as a result as well. But I remember you, you saying on the show that creators can now they can store their content on using blockchains. So essentially a podcast or a video or whatever piece it, maybe it becomes an nft right, and that way you have full control and ownership off the of the content that you put online. How is that going to disrupt the Creator economy as we know it today? I think that it's more so around the the monetization of it. Right. It's, you know, think back at the master days, where I just you know, somebody had a computer and it had a file on it and somebody stole that file and replicated it and replicating and replicated right, but that artist really was the one that was being harmed the most because, you know, they put time and money and energy into recording that song. And you know, then you see this evolutionary process of, you know, itunes coming out to buy those songs. So now it was more legitimate on sort of buying and selling of those songs. And then, you know, fast forward and now we have the spotifys and streaming services and so on, but it's still sort of following that old archaic model of paying those artists back for the work that they've done. The thing that I love about the NFT space and sort of this creator space that were evolving into with web three is the fact that individual artists are being compensated immediately. I mean within milliseconds of a piece of content being listen to or seeing or purchased right but what I think is also really cool, and this is the utility factor of it in the future of the royalties and, you know, for an artist to be, you know, selling a piece of artwork today for a price and then in two years from now, when that piece of art gets changed into another...

...hand, that royalty payment goes straight to the artist immediately and again it's within Milli seconds. So that, I think, is the most exciting part of how this world is evolving and again it's creating more control for the Creator to be able to have over that piece of art. M and just a fall of question on this, because we were debating this with my fiance over the week and we're discussing art and and ftise and we were wondering, so, let's say if you have a physical art piece that the artist then turns into an nft whether, you know, they take a photograph of and maybe they manipulated on Photoshop and create a new iteration of it and it's very valuable and it's all sold for a lot of money, are there any stipulations in that contract when you buy that that the artist cannot recreated, you know, because you could just theoretically go in and take another picture, do that again and still let again. Technically, most of the Times, in that instance, again, I'm not an art lawyer by any means, but in that instance, most of the time, the artist still owns the rights to that art. So when you go into a lot of modern art galleries, they will say, you know, no pictures. Obviously part of it because they don't want to damage the artwork and people taking pictures of it, but more so it's because that artwork is still copy written by either the artist or the estate of that artist and unless expressly written into a contract that the artist says, when I'm selling you this piece of art, you now own the copyright of this art. You know, if that happens, then sure, but but in most cases, you know, artists still have that. And Look, there's also the argument of maybe that increases the value of your piece of art. Right, it might not be in a harmful way, might actually increase because you own the physical piece of whatever this artist has created now in web three or as an nft. Right, right, that makes sense. And then so with NFTS and and brands we've seen a lot of brands hop on...

...the train and create nft versions of physical products, and that's what most marketers think of when they think of NFTS. But you've been talking about brands being able to start building communities through NFT's and I'm curious to learn how. I think that it's such a tremendous opportunity for brands right now. And you know, when you're looking at some of these nfts that are out there, it's really because they were trying to create a club or in an organization of Hey, you and I own this specific thing. We're now, you know, we have a common mindset. Are we're in in the club right because we have this piece of digital art, or digital ticket, if you will. And you know, it's not unlike car clubs, right. I own a specific car, you own a specific car. We now, you know, meet up and go for drives on the weekend and, you know, Park our cars outside of a restaurant. It's in that similar vein, right, and I think that when you come when it comes to brands, I think there's a tremendous opportunity to engage with people that are really a part of that brand or really you know, excited about, you know, consuming that product and again I think that NFT's you know really do lend itself to that and it's a way of also, potentially in the future, transferring that ownership of, you know, of that membership club or that card that you might hold to somebody else and that that would sort of gain a lot from being as a part of that. So, out of the marketing that you've seen that leverages blockchain or nft's, what's? What's one of the best ones that you've come across? I don't know if I'll a lot to talk about it, to be honest with you. I mean there's one for a very wellknown brand right now. It's a candy company that I saw. They're doing something just absolutely engaging with their consumers of the product. It's going to be coming out the summer and I'm really excited about that because it's not just about, you...

...know, I'm going on to a market place and purchasing a piece of art that's that candy. It's all about unlocking different levels of I purchase more candy. I now get further down into levels of having deeper relationship with that brand and I can create a phisical a piece of artwork myself using this in a sort of virtual space to then well as an nft. So that's really cool what's happening there. And again, there's a there's a number of brands that I think are doing a great job at it, and then there's a number of brands that I'm looking at right now that are using it because it's just the cool thing to say. They're using it, and I think that you have to really look into the why right like why am I doing something, and even for you know, back in the day when when people started doing youtube videos or clips online, it's like, are you creating a piece of content that's actually adding value to other people, or you just creating a piece of content for the sake of beat creating a piece of content exactly? So are you? Are you willing to name some of the worst applications that you've seen over and if t's out there, or do you want to keep it diplot? I would I would actually frame it a different way. I don't think that there's I personally, I don't think that there's anything really bad, because I think it's all about exploration right now and I think that we need to be in that in that open mindedness of as long as people are creating, as people are leveraging this technology and exploring it and getting excited about it's different uses. You know, there are sometimes when something you know that we might visually see is horrible, but their application of how they're using the technology might be very insightful. That sparks interest for somebody else to create off of that. So that's why I think it's almost like, you know, there...

...are no bad questions right, and it's almost like it's like as long as people are asking questions, I think that that's that's a good thing. HMM. Yeah, so I guess we're in that phase with with this technology, that it's small and more about just getting more people, more brands, more market a marketers and individuals as well just experimenting with the technology and that kind of organically is going to then push the whole industry forward and ultimately finding those but, if you would say, some of the best practices around creating these out oft activations to meet it sounds a lot, a lot, a lot of about creating community and really thinking about how you can involve those users and superfans. Absolutely, yeah, it's all about community. And so let's give it back to user privacy and user data, which both have been a huge points of conversation in the in the past couple of years and and especially around the social giants Google and facebook. And so now, on the flip side, since with blockchain your information is it's decentralized, it's encrypted, companies just can't have access to just like that. But then, on the flip side, it also allows brands to have direct access to customers who are willing to consent and share their data with them. So what are some of the practical applications that can come out of using blockchain to interact with your customers versus the social or walled gardens? Well, I think that you're going to see a huge shift over the coming years on social media platforms as a whole. I think that store your content physically on the servers of a facebook or, you know, a tick tock like service. I think that's going to go away. Personally, I think that all of that data is going to be stored in a very decentralized network where that user has direct consent on whether they want people to see it, not see it, leverage it for specific reasons I think that, you know, the big tech giants will figure out some creating ways of infiltrating some of that by giving incentives, though, right it's you...

...know, hey, if you bring your content over to us, you know, we might help you out gain more audience or something along those lines. Again, it's too early to tell in this industry really where it's going, and I think that's what it's so it's sort of, you know, exciting and a nerve racking at the same time, especially when you're building a company like mine. You know, where are the trends happening? But I think that if you look at all tion and what we stand for is we truly are for the Creator and we're you know, down to the, like I said, the independent Creator, all the way up to a medium or large size brand or agency. And with that mindset, you know, I've always given this this analogy of we want to be the sort of pick and shovel company of a gold rush, and I said this on Taylor's show. Yeah, and it's like, if you look at history, you know, the pick and Shovel Company, they just sat in the middle or the nucleus of all of this. These minds that were happening around them, but they were supplying out to it right and I think all teon's core strategy in going into this marketplace is truly you know, we have a great nft publisher. It's no code. We've done our first Beta contract on it about a month ago and we're starting to see more people take advantage of the fact that if they start organizing their content and allte on now, they'll be able to mint out that CON content in a couple months out to etherium or polygon or flow, which are a couple different blockchains that were focusing on right now just because they're more popular. And again, I think that when when we look at the core message of how we're strengthening content creators is we're truly giving them a platform to be able to send their work out in a multitude of ways. HMM. Yeah, so it's not just for the applications you may have today for your day to day absolute digital content needs, but actually future proofing your workflow...

...so that when we are all about web three, you're going to be ready. And and it's interesting because there's a lot of hype around web three and NFTS, but if you look at it, I was listening to this other podcast and they said that actually there's only about a million people in the world who own and ifts today. So it's definitely not too late to get in the game and this is probably the time that marketers should start thinking about their strategy moving forward. Is that right? Oh, a hundred percent, and I think that if you're not, you're you you've already you know, you haven't quite missed the bus, but you're sort of up approaching that and I think that anyone that wants to organically connect with people or be a part of a message, I think that you absolutely whether it's NFT's or another form of technology, I think it's always important for brands to look at ways that they're engaging with their customers. And again, I'm not saying that NFTS are the end all, be all, but I would say that you just have to look at what is starting to trend and and really engage with that. One of the things that I always love is going to when we were doing in person events can lion, that was, believe, my favorite event to go to of the year, because you see new technology or new ways of communicating with people or new ways that people are marketing you. Then you know throughout the course of nine months to a year post can lie in, you see these activations actually going out to the public that you are part of or you you know, we're on a fireside chat listening to people talking about what they're doing in the industry, and that was always a great barometer where things were going to go that year and I'm excited to go back this year because there is a tremendous of focus on nfts. There is a tremendous focus on how do you touch people in a remote way? HMM, yeah, I'll be going as well and I'll for sure mark all of the sessions that discuss these topics. I'm really excited to see that. I'm sure we're going to see...

...a lot of case studies for the awards submissions using NFTS and using it. Follow Up, while we're at can, let's do it if I actually yes, yes, I actually have a space to record. So so that would actually be perfect and I know that you you want a can lion. Speaking of I've I've won. I've won several can lions over the years. which categories and which pieces of work I honestly don't remember, which is to say you know it was. It was. The last one was for a project that that you would have never known would have been leveraging augmented reality, but it did, and so it was a it was a very it was a very exciting time for sure, and so, yeah, we'll be falling up in can but in the meanwhile, if you could give a marketer sort of a quick one on one on how to get started with NFTS, if you're curious about learning more like it, are there certain newsletters that you subscribe to or sites that you read, or just learning by doing? Like, for example, I created my metal mask while at this morning, so I'm already taking some steps towards that. But what would be the first steps for you? I will say at the beginning your head is going to feel like it's going to explode and because there is, there are so many sources of information out there, I think it's important to join your own communities. You know, there's a couple people that I talk to on a regular basis that are either very insightful in it or they themselves are starting out in the sort of web three space. Again, it's like most things, you know, it's in green yourself in a little bit of a community. Figuring out what your focus is, and I think staying true to that focus is really key. I personally have written a few articles on the topic and and you know you can see those and find those on entrepreneurcom and it really is from the more basics of marketing and web three and how to communicate out your brand. I'm sure people will find this episode very insightful and interesting and I hope you yeah, and they'll probably dive into all things web free, as I have in...

...the past couple of days and will continue to do so. Matt, I'll hopefully see you in can and will see what marketers are brands are doing in this space then. But for now, if people want to follow you or connect with you, where can they find you? I'm very active on Linkedin. So just my name Matts some Maglia, Cim a glia or you know, twitter as well. Just you know that's at. That's Maglia, and I'm sure you can have linked somewhere on all of this, but it in the episode notes. But yeah, I mean I'm very active on Linkedin and you know I'm I do respond to a lot of messages within linkedin on people and I do love talking to other people about this space and again because of that community driven experience of where we're at today, because we don't know where we're going, because they're you know, the sky really is the limit. I think it's incredibly insightful for me also to listen and to absorb what other people are saying, because it's going to help me also shape the product that I'm building. It all to you now. I love how open you are to having these conversations. In fact, I just reached out cold message you on Linkedin and and a week later, here we are. Thank you so much for coming on the show and to all of you out there. If you like what you heard, we would love those five stars, maybe a little review and share with your colleagues as well. Until next time. My name is Christine and you've been listening to brand side. You've been listening to brand side. If you like where you heard, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about creative production automation, is IT SULTRACOM? Thanks for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (34)